ENT

ENT(EAR,NOSE,THORAT)

Otolaryngologists are physicians trained in the medical and surgical management and treatment of patients with diseases and disorders of the ear, nose, throat (ENT), and related structures of the head and neck. They are commonly referred to as ENT physicians.

HOW ARE EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT SPECIALISTS TRAINED?

Otolaryngologists are ready to start practicing after completing up to 15 years of college and post-graduate training. To qualify for certification by the American Board of Otolaryngology, an applicant must first complete college (four years), medical school (four years), and at least five years of specialty training. Next, the physician must pass the American Board of Otolaryngology examination. In addition, some otolaryngologists pursue a one- or two- year fellowship for more extensive training in one of eight subspecialty areas.These subspecialty areas are allergy, facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, head and neck, laryngology (throat), otology/neurotology (ears, balance, and tinnitus), pediatric otolaryngology (children), rhinology (nose), and sleep disorders. Some otolaryngologists limit their practices to one of these eight areas.

EAR SURGERY

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Many individuals, starting from childhood, are unhappy with the size or shape of their ears. Or, for some, the ears protrude more than they should, are asymmetrical, or droop too low. Children may be teased at school; and adults might go to great lengths to hide their imperfect ears with their hair or by wearing hats. Fortunately, otoplasty, also referred to as ear plastic surgery, is readily available to cosmetically alter the ears. The procedure should only be performed by an experienced plastic surgeon, and can have a dramatic impact on a person’s appearance, confidence, and overall quality of life. This corrective surgery is extremely popular among adults and children alike. If you are interested in ear pinning, or ear plastic surgery, it is important that you are well-informed of all pertinent details before moving forward. We invite you to continue reading to familiarize yourself with the treatment, so you can determine whether it is right for you.

Otoplasty

Probably no other physical characteristic cries out for cosmetic surgery more than protruding ears. Children, long the victims of cruel nicknames like bat ears;elephant ears are the most likely candidates for otoplasty, but this surgery can be performed at any age after the ears have reached full size, usually around five to six years of age. Even if the ears are only mildly distorted, the condition can lead to self-consciousness and poor adaptation to school. When it comes to otoplasty, conventional wisdom is the earlier the better.

Adults may also benefit from this procedure, which improves self-esteem with relative ease. Often, adults choose this surgery in conjunction with other facial cosmetic surgical procedures. Not only is it possible to pin back ears, but ears can also be reshaped, reduced in size, or made more symmetrical.If you are wondering how otoplasty can improve the way you look, you need to know how otoplasty is performed and what you can expect from this procedure.

Successful cosmetic surgery is a result of good rapport between patient and surgeon. Trust, based on realistic expectations and exacting medical expertise, develops in the consulting stages before surgery. Your surgeon can answer specific questions about your specific needs.General good health and realistic expectations are prerequisites. It is also important to understand the surgery. Otoplasty will not alter hearing ability. What is important for successful otoplasty is that the ears be in proportion to the size and shape of the face and head.When considering otoplasty, parents must be confident that they have their child’s best interests at heart. A positive attitude toward the surgery is an important factor in all facial cosmetic surgery, but it is especially critical when the patient is a child or adolescent.

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EYE SURGERY

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Wearing contacts and glasses can be cumbersome for some people, and can have a negative effect on their active lifestyles. Many people are choosing to take charge of their vision in a more permanent way. Eye specialists have made incredible advancements in vision correction surgery, also known as refractive and laser eye surgery, in recent years. There are many types of vision correction surgeries. Most procedures work to reshape the cornea so that light passing through it can focus on the retina. Other surgeries replace the lens of the eye.Here are the different types of corrective surgeries, what they improve, and how they work.

LASIK (laser in-situ keratomileusis)

This surgery reshapes the underlying corneal tissue to focus light into the eye and reach the retina. This procedure is ideal for patients who are nearsighted, farsighted, or have astigmatism. What makes LASIK unique is its methodology. Eye surgeons create a flap of the outside layer of the cornea in order to access the underlying tissue. The procedure requires precision, and advancements in computer imaging technology allow LASIK specialists to create detailed corneal images and guide the treatment.

PRK (photorefractive keratectomy)

PRK is a procedure that uses a laser to reshape the cornea. Unlike LASIK, PRK only reshapes the surface of the cornea. It’s ideal for mild to moderate nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism. PRK can also work with computer imaging technology.

LASEK (laser epithelial keratomileusis)

This procedure is a slight variation of PRK. The doctor will create a flap where epithelial cells are loosened by applying an alcohol solution. Then, a laser reshapes the cornea and the flap is set and secured with a soft contact lens so that it can heal around the correction. LASEK treats nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism.

ALK (automated lamellar keratoplasty)

ALK can help people with severe nearsightedness and few levels of farsightedness, although LASIK has all but replaced ALK as a method of correction. For this procedure, an eye specialists creates a flap in the cornea to access the underlying tissue. No laser is used, and instead, the doctor makes an incision in the sub-layer of the cornea to reshape and correct vision.

RLE (refractive lens exchange)

RLE is a procedure for correcting cataracts. The doctor makes a small incision to remove the natural lens of the eye on the edge of the cornea. The lens is replaced with a silicone or plastic lens. This procedure is also known as CLE (clear lens extraction) or RLR (refractive lens replacement) and can be used to correct severe farsightedness or nearsightedness. It is also used to correct thin corneas, dry eyes, and other minor eye problems. Additional procedures may be needed to correct astigmatism.

THROAT SURGERY

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Surgery for Throat Cancer

Surgery is the preferred treatment for early-stage throat cancers. The throat is comprised of the pharynx and the larynx.For advanced stage or recurrent throat cancer, we may combine surgery with other forms of treatment, such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. These treatments may be used to shrink the tumor before surgery. Nearby lymph nodes may also be removed during surgery to test for the presence of cancer.

The following are some surgical procedures for throat cancer:

  • Vocal cord stripping: With this technique, a long surgical instrument is used to remove the outer layers of tissue on the vocal cords. This approach may be used for a biopsy, or to treat some stage 0 cancers confined to the vocal cords. Vocal cord stripping rarely impacts speech after the operation.
  • Laser surgery: In laser surgery, an endoscope with a high-intensity laser on the tip is inserted down the throat. The tumor can then be vaporized or cut out using the laser.
  • Cordectomy: In a cordectomy, part or all of the vocal cords are removed. This approach may be used to treat glottic cancer that is very small or located only on the surface tissues. Patients who receive a cordectomy may experience changes in speech. Removing part of a vocal cord may lead to a hoarse voice. If both vocal cords are removed, speech would no longer be possible.
  • Laryngectomy: An operation in which part or all of the larynx is removed.
  • Partial laryngectomy: For small laryngeal cancers, it may be possible to remove only the portion of the voice box where the cancer exists, leaving the rest of the larynx intact. A partial laryngectomy may be used to remove the portion of the larynx above the vocal cords (supraglottic laryngectomy), or only one of the two vocal cords (hemilaryngectomy).
  • Total laryngectomy: For more extensive laryngeal cancers, sometimes a total laryngectomy may be the recommended treatment. With this procedure, the entire voice box is removed. Then, in a process known as a tracheostomy, the windpipe is surgically moved toward a hole in the neck for breathing. For patients who follow this treatment option, normal speech is no longer possible, but other forms of speech can be learned. Foods and liquids can be swallowed normally, just as they were before the procedure.